How weather affects roof repair

It’s winter and that means coats, hats, heat, and if you are lucky, a fire in the fireplace. Hot chocolate does not hurt, either. What does hurt is sitting at the kitchen table and suddenly having snow land on your plate while lazily enjoying Sunday breakfast, especially if it does not come from either a silly child or a dog shaking itself off after being outside. If it is not your child or dog, then you know you need to call someone for roof repair.

 

So, you get a few names from a few friends and relatives. Then, you go online and check them out. You make sure that they are all licensed and insured. You check their standings with the Better Business Bureau, as well as the reviews on the company site and social media. This whittles your list down to two or three. So, you ask all three to come out and give you an estimate.

The representative from each company comes out and lets you know that you should replace the entire roof and not just the part that failed and landed in your oatmeal. You groan because you know it will not be cheap and then you ask a more important question of whether or not the job can be done now or if it will have to wait for warmer weather.

Each of the residential roof repair companies gives you a different response. This is because there are many factors to consider when setting up a roofing job for the middle of winter. First and foremost is the actual temperature on the roof. You have to remember to include the wind-chill when deciding if you and your crew can work outside as no one will be happy freezing while they are working. Generally speaking, 20 degrees is the lowest temperature they will work in.

It is not just people that are affected by the cold. Compressors and nail guns can be affected, as well. The humidity in the compressor can turn to ice and cause the nails to not be driven in correctly.

Another thing that has to be considered is if there is ice and snow on the roof. Not only will someone have to remove it, but the roof will remain slippery after it is gone. This means it is even more dangerous to be working on the roof.

Finally, when determining whether or not your residential roofers can replace your roof this winter, the manufacturer of the shingles needs to be notified. Shingles become more brittle in the cold and the glue may lose its adhesiveness in the cold. The manufacturer is responsible for the self-seal to properly bond to the roof when activated. The roofing contractor is responsible for making sure the crew is comfortable enough to apply the shingles properly and that the temperature or countermeasures taken are sufficient to have a constant airflow to avoid overdriven or underdriven nails.

The crew leader is responsible for determining if the roof is tabbing correctly and if cold weather precautions need to be taken. Most of the time the job can wait until it warms up a bit. It depends on the seriousness of the situation.